Clear Rule

The rules around marijuana use can be confusing. But when it comes to marijuana use and driving, all you need to remember is one clear rule:

Driving impaired is illegal everywhere.

Driving impaired is illegal everywhere.

Everything else can get kind of hazy.

When you feel different, you drive different. Everything else can get kind of hazy. So, if you want to think through some of the things experts and leading researchers are learning about marijuana’s effect on your driving, you can do that here.
Index
Issue
1
1 Clear Rule
Subject

Driving impaired is illegal everywhere.

Why it matters?

All states have laws prohibiting driving while impaired.

Driving while impaired means driving under the influence of alcohol and other drugs — including marijuana.

Laws prohibiting driving while impaired by any substance — legal or illegal — have existed for many decades, and law enforcement officers are trained to observe drivers’ behavior and to identify when a driver is impaired.

Even in states that have legalized the use of marijuana, it is still illegal to drive under the influence of the drug.

Clarity Level
High
Additional Sources
Abstract
This NHTSA resource provides the latest research on drug-impaired driving, misconceptions about marijuana use, and what you can do to make smarter choices to drive safely.
Abstract
This report describes the effects of THC vs. alcohol on the human body; the challenges of measuring driving impairment resulting from marijuana use; and the crash risk associated with marijuana impaired driving. It also presents information on training for law enforcement to detect marijuana impairment in drivers.
Abstract
This NHTSA resource provides the latest research on drug-impaired driving, misconceptions about marijuana use, and what you can do to make smarter choices to drive safely.
This ranking indicates how “settled” we feel an issue is. Issues that are clear-cut, fully-researched, and conclusive have a “High” clarity level. Issues that are involved in ongoing research, or focus on matters that require additional study, have “Medium” or “Low” clarity levels — depending on the amount and strength of supporting research.